பாயும் வேகம் ஜெட் லீ தாண்டா
பன்ச் வெச்சா இட்லி தாண்டா
Rated PG - for Pseudo-DK, DMK, Liberals, Marxists....
ஊர்ல சொல்றது சொலவடை
உண்மையைச் சொல்றது இட்லிவடை

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

பாவம் கல்கி - நந்தினி விஜயராகவன் விளக்கம்


பாவம் கல்கி என்ற பதிவுக்கு, நந்தினி விஜயராகவன் அனுப்பியிருக்கும் விளக்கம்.

From Nandini Vijayaraghavan

Sivakamiyin Sabadham is a nationalised novel. So, several publishers publish this work. This has led to differences in proper nouns and certain chapter titles among the different editions.

There are several such variations among the editions, such as

1] The first chapter in Volume 1 is titled “Travellers” in certain editions and “Temple” in others.

2] Mamallar's cousin is called Aditya Varman in certain editions and Achutha Varman is others

3] Paranjyothi's rank in the army is alternately referred to as Senathipathi (Marshal) and Thalapathi (Commander) in Volume 4 of various editions

4] The title referred to in the clipping is yet another example of the variations in titles among edition. In certain editions, the title is 'Parrot & The Blind Man'. In others it is 'Parrot and the Kite'. Both are apt because in that chapter Kamali calls Kannabiran blind as he cannot understand why the romance between Mamallar and Sivakami cannot culminate in marriage. Kalki also uses the analogy of a kite and a parrot to illustrate the difference in Mamallar's and Sivakami's social status in that very chapter.

5] Similarly, whether the chapter title ought to be 'Mamallar's Fervour' or 'Mamallar's Encouragement' is open to interpretation.

I leave it to the readers to decide whether or not my translation is literal.

நிஜமாகவே பாவம் கல்கி!

12 Comments:

Anonymous said...

//நிஜமாகவே பாவம் கல்கி!//
ஹீ ஹீ ... கீழே விழுந்தாலும் ... ஹீ ஹீ ....

Anonymous said...

ஆங்கிலம் இனி மெல்ல சாகும் - அவர் சுப்பு டோல்ட்

பொன்.முத்துக்குமார் said...

நாவல் தலைப்பையும் நாவலாசிரியர் பேரையும் மாத்தாம இருக்காங்களே அதுவே பெரிய விஷயம். :)

Anonymous said...

With the nationalisation of Kalki's novels, many publishers brought out various editions of Kalki's books. Some were not produced with care. The DTP operator might have doubled as the Editor. Still I will not be harsh with them.
Let us not pass uncharitable comments on Nandini's book. It is difficult to bring out the flavour of Kalki's style in English. The book is not meant for persons who can read Tamil.
If there are couple of mistakes, let us not make a mountain out of a mole hill.
-P S R

jaisankar jaganathan said...

நிஜமாகவே பாவம் கல்கி!

dr_senthil said...

மொழிபெயர்ப்பு என்பது நமக்கு தோன்றுவது போல எழுதுவதா அல்லது மூல கதையை சேதபடுதாமல் அச்சு அசலாக பெயர்ப்பதா?

Bramha said...

Y'day I defended the author for her maiden work. Given her pedigree, find her response immature and childish.

Thanks
Bramha

basha said...

மீசையில் மண் ஒட்டலியே!

basha said...

sand did not stick to moustache!

Umesh Srinivasan said...

எது செய்தாலும்,அது எவ்வளவு அபத்தமாக இருந்தாலும், அதை நியாயப்படுத்திப் பேசும் பாங்கும், அதற்கு வக்காளத்து வாங்கும் சிலரும்....உண்மையிலேயே பரிதாபம் கல்கி....

ஜெ. said...

கல்கியின் பக்தரான கடுகு (P.S.R.) சாரின் பெருந்தன்மையான் கருத்தைப் பாராட்டுவோம். ஆங்கில மொழி பெயர்ப்பாளருக்கு, கருத்து / மொழிபெயற்பு தவறுகளை அவரின் மெயிலுக்கோ / ப்லாக் சைட்டிலோ தெரிவித்தால், அடுத்தபதிப்பில் திருத்திக்கொள்ளும் வாய்ப்பும், அடுத்த முயற்சிகளில் இன்னும் கவனமும் கொள்ள உத்வேகம் வரும். கல்கியை தமிழில் படித்தபின் ஆங்கிலத்தில் படிக்கப் போகிறவ்ர்கள் யாரேனும் இருக்கிறார்களா?! - ஜெ.

R. J. said...

I received the following links from the author.

1. Book trailer for Sivakamiyin Sabatham:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUKU79U_P1w

2. A Review of Sivakamiyin Sabadham Vol I and II; Kalki Krishnamurthy; English Translation by Nandini Vijayaraghavan;

- by Shana Susan Ninan

The link is:

http://www.indianbookreviews.com/2012/12/09/the-promise-of-love-and-life/

There is a para in the above review I like to quote:

"There are a few places where English cannot do the job of the vernacular, and some paragraphs seem to fall flat, where it could have been expressed better. Especially the ones describing nature, natural occurrences and Sivakami’s dance performances. But that has more to do with the language’s shortcomings rather than the translator’s disadvantages with the novel. I’ve watched vigorous Bharatanatyam performances and arangetrams live, but when you read it on paper, written in English that too, it lends little charm to the reader, conveying much less of the experience." This seems to be the proper view.

-R. J.